The Kingdom Of Spain - Factbook


  • Commission

    Autonomus Community Of Andalucía
    Factbook

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    List Of Provinces

    • Huelva
    • Cádiz
    • Granada
    • Almería
    • Jaén
    • Córdoba
    • Sevilla
    • Málaga

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    Autonomus Community Of Murcia
    Factbook

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  • Commission

    Autonomus Community Of Valencia | Comunitat Valenciana
    Factbook

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    List Of Provinces

    • Alicante
    • Valencia
    • Castellón

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    Autonomus Community Of Scotland
    Factbook

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    List Of Provinces

    • City Of Glasgow
    • City Of Edinburgh
    • Fife
    • North Lanakshire
    • South Lanakshire
    • Aberdeenshire
    • Highlands
    • City of Aberdeen
    • West Lothian
    • Renfrewshire
    • Falkirk
    • Perth & Kinross
    • Dumfries & Galloway
    • City of Dundee
    • North Ayrshire
    • East Ayrshire
    • Angus
    • Scottish Borders
    • South Ayrshire
    • East Durbartonshire
    • East Lothian
    • Moray
    • East Renfrewshire
    • Stirling
    • Midlothian
    • West Dunbartonshire
    • Argyll & Bute
    • Inverclyde
    • Clackmannanshire
    • Na h-Eileanan Siar (Western Isles)
    • Shetland Islands
    • Orkney Islands

  • Commission

    Autonomus Community Of Cataluña / Catalunya
    Factbook

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    List Of Provinces

    • Barcelona
    • Girona
    • Lleida
    • Tarragona

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    Autonomus Community Of Castilla La Mancha
    Factbook

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    List Of Provinces

    • Albacete
    • Ciudad Real
    • Cuenca
    • Guadalajara
    • Toledo

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    Autonomus Community Of Londres / London
    Factbook

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    List Of Provinces

    • Londres
    • England
    • Wales

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    Autonomus Community Of Madrid
    Factbook

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    Autonomus Community Of Aragón
    Factbook

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    List Of Provinces

    • Huesca
    • Teruel
    • Zaragoza

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    Authonomous Community Of La Rioja
    Factbook

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    Authonomous Community Of Cantabria
    Factbook

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    Authonomous Community of Nueva York / New York
    Factbook

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    Authonomous City Of Melilla
    Factbook

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    Authonomous Community Islas Canarias
    Factbook

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    List Of Provinces:

    • Las Palmas de Gran Canaria
    • Santa Cruz de Tenerife

    Authonomous City Of Ceuta
    Factbook

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    Authonomous Community Of Île-de-France
    Factbook:

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    Authonomous Community Of Grequia
    Factbook:

    • Capitals:
      • Rome
      • Athens
    • Anthem: Inno di Grequia
    • Languages: Spanish, Italian, Greek
    • Provinces: 2

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    List Of Provinces:

    • Nova Italia
    • Grecia

    Chartered Community of Navarra
    Factbook:

    • Capital: Pamplona
    • Anthem: Himno de Navarra
    • Languages: Spanish, Euskera
    • Provinces: 1

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    Authonomous Community Of País Vasco
    Factbook:

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    List Of Provinces:

    • Álava
    • Guipúzcoa
    • Vizcaya

    Authonomous Community Of Galicia
    Factbook:

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    List Of Provinces:

    • A Coruña
    • Lugo
    • Ourense
    • Pontevedra

    Authonomous City Of Gibraltar
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    Authonomous Community Of Antequera
    Factbook:

    • Capital: Antequera
    • Provinces: 1

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    Authonomous Community Of Islas Baleares
    Factbook:

    • Capital: Palma de Mallorca
    • Anthem: link text
    • Languages: Spanish, Catalan
    • Provinces: 4

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    List Of Provinces:

    • Mallorca
    • Menorca
    • Ibiza
    • Formentera

    Principality Of Asturias
    Factbook:

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    Authonomous Community Of Castilla Y León
    Factbook:

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    List Of Provinces:

    • Ávila
    • Burgos
    • León
    • Zamora
    • Valladolid
    • Soria
    • Salamanca
    • Segovia
    • Palencia

    Authonomous Community Of Extremadura
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    List Of Provinces:

    • Cáceres
    • Badajoz

    Authonomous Community Of Germanium
    Factbook:

    • Capital: Berlín
    • Anthem: Himno de Germanium
    • Languages: Spanish, German, Dutch
    • Provinces: 4

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    List Of Provinces:

    • Danereich
    • Berlín
    • Osternium
    • Luxamsdutch

    Authonomous Community of Portugalia
    Factbook:

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    List of Provinces:

    • Oporto
    • Algarve
    • Lisboet

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    THE SPANISH MOST IMPORTANT POLITICAL PARTIES

    Partido Popular
    Factbook:

    • Seats: 176
    • Leader: Jesús Aguilar
    • Ideology: Centre-Right

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    Partido Socialista Obrero Español
    Factbook:

    • Seats: 75
    • Leader: Pedro Sánchez
    • Idoelogy: Centre-Right

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    Unidas Podemos
    Factbook:

    • Seats: 30
    • Leader: Pablo Iglesias
    • Ideology: Far-left / Left

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    Ciudadanos
    Factbook

    • Seats: 34
    • Leader: Albert Rivera
    • Ideology: Centre / Centre-Right

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    VOX
    Factbook:

    • Seats: 10
    • Leader: Santiago Abascal
    • Idology: Far-right

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    Esquerra Republicana De Cataluña
    Factbook:

    • Seats: 8
    • Leader: Oriol Junqueras
    • Ideology: Left, Catalonian Secessionist

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    Junts Per Catalunya
    Factbook:

    • Seats: 6
    • Leader: Carles Puigdemont
    • Ideology: Centre-right, Catalonian Secessionist

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    Partido Nacionalista Vasco
    Factbook:

    • Seats: 5
    • Leader: Andoni Ortuzar
    • Idoelogy: Centre-right, Basque Nationalist

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    Euskal Herria Bildu
    Factbook:

    • Seats: 2
    • Leader: Arnaldo Otegui
    • Ideology: Fra-left, Basque Secessionist

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    Navarra Suma
    Factbook:

    • Seats: 1
    • Leader: Javier Esparza
    • Ideology: Centre-right

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    Coalición Canaria
    Factbook:

    • Seats: 1
    • Leader: José Miguel Barragán
    • Ideology: Centre, Canarian Nationalist

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    Compromís
    Factbook:

    • Seats: 1
    • Leader: Mónica Oltra
    • Ideology: Left, Valencian Nacionalist

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    PRC

    • Seats: 1
    • Leader: Miguel Ángel Revilla
    • Ideology: centre, Cantabrian Regionalist

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    Candidatura D' Unitat Popular (CUP)

    • Seats: 0
    • Leader: Anna Gabriel
    • Ideology: Anarchism, Catalan Secessionist

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  • Commission

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    VISIT SPAIN

    Visit Spain has opened its own website to promote Spain in other countries around Europe. Our country it's very bast and has lots of things to offer, and with the aid of this useful webpage, we'll provide some information to any tourist wishing to visit Spain soon. In their website, you will be able to find information about different cities all around Spain. The webpage is regularly updated.

    Visit Spain Website


  • Commission

    Antequera


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    Antequera is the capital city of the Kingdom of Spain. In this city, we'll appreciate 2 diiferent historical periods. In the original city, there are many historical monuments that have been internationally recognised by millions of people, and in the new city, or as the residents call it, "parte nueva", we can find the Formula 1 Circuit, the financial city and some gouvernamental buildings. We will take you through the secrets of Antequera, its monuments and important places. But, first things first. You can't miss Los Dólmenes, El Torcal or La Peña de los Enamorados. If we talk about Spanish food, or Andalusian food (that has some things in common with the food from Antequera), we should talk about el Mollete de Antequera, la Porra Antequerana or Las Migas Antequeranas. And in Christmas time, you'll be able to find Mantecados de Antequera. So, if you come to Spain for gastronomical matters, you must stop in Antequera and give all of this disehes a try.

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    When you come to Antequera, you must take in count that you'll be able to see lots of places in the oldest part, and also lots of them in the newest part. Here you'll be able to find a list of the Antequera's must see:​

    • Los Dólmenes de Antequera (Menga, Viera y El Romeral): In 2016, los Dólmenes de Antequera entered the UNESCO's World Heritage Places' List. El Romeral dolmen is not in the same place where Menga and Viera are. El dolmen de Viera was discovered between 1903 and 1905 by brothers Antonio and José Viera from Antequera, who also discovered El Romeral. That's why it was called like that. El dolmen de Menga is very special, because its orientation is different from the other dolmens in the World.

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    • La Peña de Los Enamorados: The mountain was named after a legend from the local oral tradition. The most well-known version of the legend says that two young Moorish lovers from rival clans, a young man from Antequera and girl from nearby Archidona, threw themselves from the rock while being pursued by the girl's father and his men. This romantic legend was later adapted by Robert Southey. In his Laila and Manuel the lovers were a Muslim girl and her father's Christian slave. The mountain is also popularly known as "Montaña del Indio" because it looks like the head of an American Indian when seen from certain angles.

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    • El Torcal de Antequera: El Torcal de Antequera is an amazing place where you can see stars at night, peculiar rocks and even some incredible animals. The mountain, that is located south of Antequera, is not very high, but it can snow there. You can't get there by train or by bus, you'll need to get your own car. If you come here during the Perseidas, you'll be able to see some falling stars. It also has an astronomical observatory.

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    Quite far away from the oldest part of the city (exactly, 15 kilometers), we can find the newest part of Antequera. The history of how the city ended up as Antequera is quite long. Since Antequera was declared capital city of Spain along with Madrid, it didn't had the capacity to host so many official buildings and move everything there, but, it had to have some subdelegations and some other places to act like a residence for the President. So, the city of South Beach was elected as Antequera. Now, the city is divided in 2, and its population has increased since then.

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    The newest part of Antequera hosts some important buildings, but the Authonomous Community Parliament it's located at the oldest part of the city. A bus line and a train line connects both parts of the city and they run every 10 minutes.


  • Commission

    Málaga


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    Málaga, capital of the province of the same name, is the fifth most populated city in Spain. It is located in the south of the Iberian Peninsula, in a privileged spot. The city covers 398.25 square kilometres and has a population of almost 568,000 inhabitants, although almost a million people live in the metropolitan area. The main environmental and geographical factors that have affected the city's evolution and development are maritime influences, its location in two river valleys (the Guadalhorce and the Guadalmedina), its topographic relief and its climate.

    Whilst the Mediterranean Sea bathes the Málaga coastline, the Málaga Mountains close ranks behind the city to form a barrier of peaks that protects it from the cold, while the regulating effect of the sea gives the area its characteristically mild temperatures. The hottest months are July and August. December and February are usually the coldest. The average temperatures fall between a maximum of 22.8° C and a minimum of 13° C. Rainfall in Málaga follows the seasons, with the most abundant rainfalls occurring in autumn and winter. Málaga has a natural heritage of great environmental wealth. The natural setting of the estuary of the Guadalhorce, located within an island of 122 hectares demarcated by the branches of the river in its final stretch, is a stopping point for hundreds of migratory species and is noted for its great ecological value. The Natural Park Montes de Málaga occupies an area of 4,996 hectares that are home to over 230 plant species and over 160 types of vertebrates.

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    Transport in Málaga is very developed. It has an International Airport that connects the city with the rest of Europe and Spain, an Underground System with 2 lines, a train service that connects the city with the rest of the coast and some inland villages, an AVE rail station, which also connects the city with the rest of Spain, a port and a huge bus network. The town hall also offers some touristic buses and guided tours around the city.

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    One of the most famous streets in Málaga it's the Calle Larios. Every single Christmas, a lights show gets place 3 times a day. This does not only attracts tourist, it boosts the local economy and make Christmas more spectacular. But this is not the only tourist attraction in Málaga. The Plaza de la Constitución (located at the end of Calle Larios), Picasso's museum, Pompidou museum. Definetely, we can affirm that Málaga is the city of the museums.


  • Commission

    Fuerzas Y Cuerpos de Seguridad del Estado (FFCCSE)

    • Guardia Civil

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    La Guardia Civil is the oldest law enforcement agency covering the whole of Spain. It is organised as a military force charged with police duties under the authority of the Ministry of Defence, the Ministry of the Interior and the Ministry of Finance (in its Customs duties). The corps is colloquially known as the Benemérita. In annual surveys, it generally ranks as the national institution most valued by Spanish people, closely followed by other law enforcement agencies and the military. It has both a regular national role and undertakes specific foreign peace-keeping missions.

    • Policía Nacional

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    La Policía Nacional is the national civilian police force of Spain. The CNP (Cuerpo Nacional de Policía) is mainly responsible for policing urban areas, whilst countryside policing is generally the responsibility of the Guardia Civil. The CNP operates under the authority of Spain's Ministry of the Interior. They mostly handle criminal investigation, judicial, terrorism and immigration matters. The powers of the Cuerpo Nacional de Policía varies according to the autonomous communities, Ertzaintza in the Basque Country, Mossos d'Esquadra in Catalonia, and Policía Foral (Foruzaingoa) in Navarre are the primary police agencies while BESCAM in the Madrid region is more of a resources provider. In Andalusia, Aragon, Asturias, Galicia, and Valencia the Policía Nacional units are functionally acting directly under the orders of the autonomous communities to which they are attached.

    • Ertzaintza

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    La Ertzaintza, is the autonomous police force for the Basque Country, largely replacing the Spanish Policía Nacional and Guardia Civil (Civil Guard). An Ertzaintza member is called an ertzaina.

    • Mossos d'Esquadra

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    Los Mossos d'Esquadra are the police force of Catalonia, largely replacing the Spanish Policía Nacional and Guardia Civil. They trace their origins back to squads formed in 1719.

    • Policía Foral de Navarra

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    La Policía Foral de Navarra is the autonomous police force for the chartered autonomous community of Navarre in Spain, largely replacing the Spanish Policía Nacional and Guardia Civil. It operates across the Community, and was founded from a traffic police unit set up by the Provincial Council of Navarre in 1929. As of 2007, the force had 925 policemen with medium-term plans to increase that number to about 1,200.

    • Cuerpo General de la Policía Canaria

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    La Policía Canaria are the police force of the autonomous community of Islas Canarias, Spain. It was formed in 2010 by Paulino Rivero, the Ex-President of the Canary Islands. They are able to do the most basic functions of a police force, but they not have many competences.

    • Servicio de Vigilancia Aduanera

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    El Servicio de Vigilancia Aduanera is a Spanish law enforcement agency responsible for the investigation and prosecution of cases involving contraband, illegal drugs, financial evasion and violations, money laundering, surveillance for financial police purposes and the provision of judicial police services.

    Fuerzas Y Cuerpos De Seguridad Con Estados Especiales (FFCCSEE)

    • Metropolitan Police & City Of London Police

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    The Metropolitan Police and the City Of London Police are 2 law enforcement agencies that supervise the Authonomous Community of Londres. They are called "the mets" (Los Metropolitanos). They cooperate with la Guardia Civil and the Policía Nacional.

    • Scottish Police

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    The Scottish police is a law enforcement agency that supervise the Authonomous Community of Scotland. They cooperate with la Guardia Civil and Policía Nacional in many tasks around the Authonomous Community, and they are incharge of the Scottish Parliament protection.


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    The Spanish Education System

    Spain is divided by Authonomous Communities and Authonomous Cities (which are Ceuta and Melilla). Every single territory considered as Authonomous Community or City has their right to manage the education system, but not everything. They decide about the school calendar and they provide equipment to the schools. But the major decisions, like what the kids learn, what subjects there are, the timetable of schools during the school year and the money comes from the Spanish Government (the Ministry of Education and Sport).

    There are also 3 types of schools: Escuelas Públicas - Public Schools (all their money comes from the authonomous community or the Spanish Goverment); Escuelas Concertadas - Concerted Schools (which their money comes from private funds as the parents and also get money from public institutions) and the Escuelas Privadas - Private Schools (whose money is exclusively from private funds).

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    The logo of the Ministry of Education and Sport

    • Kindergarten / Guardería

    The Kindergarten is not a compulsory part of the Spanish Education System. That's means it's usually managed by the municipal corporation or by private enterprises that offers their services in exchange of paying them for their job. There are also kindergartens managed by consortiums, which have some agreedments with town halls or authonomous governments (even the Spanish Government) to have funds from them.

    • Early Childhood Education / Educación Infantil

    The Early Childhood education is for kids between 3 and 6 years old. It's not compulsory step on the Education System, but it's highly recommended as the objective is hel the small kids to get better physical, afective, social and intelectual skills. It's free on public schools.

    • Primary Education / Educación Infantil

    The Primary Education is for kids between 6 and 12 years old. There are 6 levels on this period, which are 1º de Primaria, 2º de Primaria... and so on until 6º de Primaria. It's compulsory and some authonomous communities give the textbooks free. This period is also free in Public Schools, but not in Private or Concerted Schools. Kids learn Geography, Art, Spanish, English, French, Maths and Biology. They also do P.E. Other subjects can be added by the authonomous communities (like Religion or Ethic Values).

    • Secondary Education / Educación Secundaria Obligatoria (ESO)

    (In development)


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