EU Legislation


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    EU Accord on Climate Change
    EU Res. #1**

    QUOTE

    With passage in the EP, I, the undersigned to hereby commend and set forth this document to and for the EU, with the full expectation of the resultant good.

    -Michael McDowell, TD, Leader of Her Majesty's Official Loyal Opposition, Parliament of Derbyshire and Fife and for the Bailiwick of St-Honor?

    The Br?xelles Protocol on Environment and Climate Change
    [The following is the original treaty as prepared by Derbyshire and Fife Minister of State on Climate Change, the Rt Hon. the Lord Jenkin of Roding, MP, PC, OM, as ratified by the Parliament of Derbyshire and Fife and the Bailiwick of St-Honor? and proposed by the Rt Hon. Michael McDowell, TD, PC, MP, Prime Minister and First Lord of the Treasury of the Commonwealth Dominion of Derbyshire and Fife.]

    Preamble
    Title I: Greenhouse Gas Reductions (Transport)
    Title II: Greenhouse Gas Reductions (Manufacturing)
    Title III: Greenhouse Gas Reductions (Energy)
    Title IV: Environmental Initiatives
    Title V: Amendment Process
    Title VI: Implementation

    Preamble
    Be it resolved by all signatories hereto that climate change by means of greenhouse gases, herein defined as carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, sulfur hexafluoride, HFC?s, PFC?s and CFC?s, produced through transport, manufacture and the production of electricity should be kerbed in production so as to preserve the atmosphere and environment; to wit, it is an indisputable fact that sufficient irrefutable scientific evidence has been brought to the attention of the signatories hereto and the global public in general to convince said parties beyond reasonable doubt of the existence of climate change. To wit, the purpose of the treaty shall be to reduce the emission of said greenhouse gases so as to prevent additional irreparable harm to the environment.

    Title I
    Title I of this treaty shall concern the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions through transport.

    Article I
    Petrol consumption emission and future technologies.

    Section I
    It shall be the policy of all signatories hereto that greenhouse emissions, afore defined, shall be cut overall by no less than twenty per cent through means of exhaust and the utilisation of petrol-fueled implements.

    Section II
    Within nine months of the ratification of this treaty by a signatory, said country shall make available five, ten and fifteen per cent ethanol fuels at equitable parity and availability of conventional petrol.

    Section IV
    As new technology presents itself, all signatories have the obligation to share such information, whereas said information and/or technology would further reduce emissions addressed in this title.

    Section V
    Such changes shall be addressed by amendment of this treaty, the means of which shall be defined forthwith.

    Article II
    The efficiency of motorvehicles.

    Section I
    The application of fuel-efficient technologies to the manufacture of motorvehicles shall be regulated first, by this treaty, and second, by individual governments, which may increase fuel efficiency requirements, but may not decrease them below the standard of this treaty.

    Section II
    The application of the above policy shall not be limited to the manufacture of motorvehicles, but throughout this treaty.

    Section III
    For the intents of this section and all subsequent sections of this article, the term ?motorvehicle? shall be read to refer to sports utility vehicles, cars and non-commercial trucks.

    Section IV
    Motorvehicles shall be classed, according to fuel efficiency, into three divisions.

    Section V
    Class I motorvehicles shall be defined as having a fuel efficiency of more than forty miles per gallon, or accepted metric equivalent.

    Section VI
    Class II motorvehicles shall be defined as having a fuel efficiency of between thirty and forty miles per gallon, or accepted metric equivalent.

    Section VII
    Class III motorvehicles shall be defined as having a fuel efficiency of between twenty and thirty miles per gallon, or accepted metric equivalent.

    Section VIII
    Motorvehicles having a fuel efficiency not sufficient to qualify in class III shall no longer be produced beginning nine months subsequent to the ratification of this treaty by a signatory. All such motorvehicles shall be referred to as class Z. Class Z motorvehicles shall also be defined so as to include all motor vehicles produced no earlier than 1995, and progressing from the ratification by a signatory concurrent to time elapsed subsequent to ratification. All signatories shall have the relevant powers to regulate, manage or otherwise impugn such motorvehicles.

    Section IX
    All signatories shall be directed to encourage the purchase, by private citizens, of class I motorvehicles through fiscal or otherwise means.

    Section X
    Section IX shall have no legally binding powers and shall not, if implemented, be used as a legal safeguard by an implementing signatory from prosecution relating to the wrongful implementation of section IX.

    Title II
    Title II of this treaty shall concern greenhouse gas emissions by means of manufacture.

    Article I
    Proscription.

    Section I
    This treaty shall prohibit the emission of chlorofluorocarbons.

    Section II
    The prohibition of chlorofluorocarbons shall begin three months subsequent to the ratification by a signatory.

    Section III
    All signatories shall have the power to implement this and the subsequent article.

    Section IV
    This treaty shall prohibit the emission of sulfur hexafluoride.

    Section V
    The proscription schedule of sulfur hexafluoride shall be governed by section II of this article.

    Article II
    Severe reduction.

    Section I
    The emission of carbon dioxide, methane, PFC?s and HFC?s shall be reduced by twenty per cent within ten years of the ratification of this treaty by a signatory.

    Section II
    All signatories shall have the power to implement the previous section.

    Article III
    Minimal reduction.

    Section I
    The emission of nitrous oxide shall be reduced by ten per cent within ten years of the ratification of this treaty by a signatory.

    Title III
    Title III shall concern the emission of greenhouse gasses through the production of energy.

    Article I
    Proscriptions.

    Section I
    The emission of greenhouse gasses other than carbon dioxide in the production of energy shall be prohibited beginning nine months subsequent to the ratification of this treaty by a signatory.

    Section II
    All signatories shall have the power to implement the above section.

    Article II
    Severe reductions.

    Section I
    The emission of carbon dioxide by means of energy production shall be reduced by no less than twenty-five per cent within eight years from the ratification of this treaty by a signatory.

    Section II
    Section II of article I shall apply to this article.

    Title IV
    Title IV shall concern environmental initiatives.

    Article I
    The ?Green Trees? initiative: part I.

    Section I
    In accordance with the policy set out by the Rt Hon. Michael Howard, MP, PC, one tree shall be planted for every tonne of emissions from aeroplanes.

    Section II
    This shall be implemented by means of a value added tax, to be adjudicated and applied individually in each country. In accordance with NS UN law, no monies shall aggregate to a regional fund.

    Section III
    Article I of title IV may be ratified or rejected independent of the treaty of the whole.

    Article II
    The ?Green Trees? initiative: part II.

    Section I
    In accordance with the policy set out by the Rt Hon. the Lord Jenkin of Roding, MP, PC, CH, OM, Derbyshire and Fife Minister of State on Climate Change, two trees shall be provided to every household for the encouragement of arboreal development in urban, suburban and inner city neighbourhoods.

    Section II
    So as to affect section I of article II, the signatories hereto shall be directed to establish governmental departments of conservation for the implementation of said section.

    Article III
    The ?Green Trees? initiative: part III.

    Section I
    In accordance with the policy set out by President Luna da Silva of the United Provinces of Brazil, it shall be interdict to wantonly deforest any area be it public or private property.

    Section II
    Private logging companies shall not be exempted from section I of article III.

    Section III
    Signatories shall have all power of the law to implement article III.

    Title V
    Instrument of amendment.

    Article I
    Each amendment, to be affected, must either be approved by seventy-five per cent of signatories, or countries that comprise seventy-five per cent of the ratifying population.

    Article II
    Any amendment that would remove a power or instrument of this treaty must be approved by a unanimous decision of ratified signatories.

    Title VI
    Title VI shall concern the implementation of this treaty.

    Article I
    Moratorium.

    Section I
    To be affected, this treaty must be signed by sixty per cent of UN members in a region and ratified by a majority of signatories, or ratified by a number of signatories such that they comprise forty per cent of the population of all UN member countries of a region.

    Section II
    For the purposes of the European Union (NS region), the UN delegate, upon the unanimous advice of the security council and the approval of a quorum in parliament, meaning a lack of opposition, the treaty may move from signatory stage to ratifying stage.

    Addendum I
    Having previously ratified this treaty as domestic legislation, the Commonwealth Dominion of Derbyshire and Fife is counted as a signatory and as having ratified the treaty. Should any amendments be made, this domestic legislation of said Dominion shall become null and void and the Commons, assembled, of said Dominion shall re-convene to review amendments to the treaty.

    Signed, the Rt Hon. the Lord Jenkin of Roding, MP, PC, OM, CH,
    Minister of State for Climate Change and
    Signed, the Rt Hon. the Prime Minister, Michael McDowell, MP, PC, TD
    Of and for the Commonwealth Dominion of Derbyshire and Fife
    And for the Bailiwick of Saint-Honor?.

    Signed, Marcus E. Tristan, ELP
    President of the European Union


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    **

    An Act to Establish the European Court of Justice
    EU Res. #2**

    RESOLVED, that the President of the EU shall have the power to appoint interrim justices who shall serve with consent of the European Commission for a period no longer than one month or render decisions on more than five cases, whichever occurs first.

    FINDING IT DELIRIOUS that the European Court of Justice be filled to resolve present controversy do commend the European President to:

    APPOINT such justices as are needed to rule in matters pertinent to this issue only;

    DESIGNATE an attorney to appear on behalf of the European Union government before the European Court of Justice, assembled, who shall:

    PRESENT the matter at hand before their honours.

    WHEREAS all appointments shall be subject to approval of the European Commission, all presidential appointments must be confirmed by a majority vote of said Commission.

    This writ of appointment shall expire within fourteen days of its adoption.

    Signed,

    **Marcus E. Tristan

    Marcus E. Tristan, ELP
    President of the European Union**


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    **

    An Act to Establish a New European Constitution**

    The text of the new European Constitution.

    *Sidenote from the current President of the European Union -

    After elections are held for the seats of the new European Commission and winners are chosen for positions in accordance with the new Constitution, I shall hereby resign the Office of the Presidency of the European Union, and as the last act of my administration, shall dismantle the current government and its functions in order to establish the new government and its functions.

    Signed,

    Marcus E. Tristan
    Marcus E. Tristan, ELP
    President of the European Union



  • The Right To Free Education

    Preamble

    This resolution hereby ensures every citizen, as specified by these texts, of the European Union may receive free education. This resolution is deemed neccessary to ensure the progression of this Union in economic, scientific and social areas. We, the undersigned, believe that in order to of the continuation of the European Union we must create a society built upon the freedoms of the people. In order to promote freedom, we believe education must be a base fundamental of every society.

    Article I

    Title I

    The right to free education must be guaranteed amongst all member states of the European Union. Every nation must allow each citizen up until the age of 18 the right to free education. Each educational establishment must abide by an European Union curriculum as outlined below. Nations may extend this curriculum as neccessary or desired.

    Title II

    The right to free education shall be guaranteed throughout the EU by the economies of the member states. Those nations whose economic status is Fair or below, or those who have a population of fewer that 50 million citizens, may apply for funding from the European Union central bank, through applications to the European Commission for Economics [ECC]. The ECC shall ensure proceeds are available to all those applying for such funding.

    Title III

    Any nation who allows for private education shall ensure each citizen also has potential availability in publicly-owned schools. All private education establishments shall ensure that each member of the school abides by the European Union curriculum as outlined below.

    Article II

    Title I

    Hereby establishes a international curriculum to include the following subjects:

    i. National language of member nation
    ii. Maths
    iii. Science, including Biology, Chemistry and Physics
    iv. Social Education, Religion and Philosophy
    v. Modern foreign language, such as English
    vi. History
    vii. Geography
    iix. Information Technology
    ix. Media Studies

    Title II

    Hereby defines the above subjects, with inclusion of but limitation to:

    i. National language of member nation is to include the grammar, literature and linguistic aspects of the respective nation. Also to include the teaching of analytical skills of literature including poems and narrative.

    ii. Maths is to include the teaching of basic numerics with relation to economics at later levels

    iii. Science;
    a. Biology is to include teaching of the theory of evolution, as well as animal and human physiology
    b. Chemistry is to include teaching of chemical compounds with emphasis upon periodic tables and chemical processes
    c. Physics is to include the teaching of physical structures, including understanding of the universe, Big Bang theory, electricity, energy, forces and motion

    iv. Social Education, Religion and Philosophy is to include teaching of society, politics, understanding of major religions and philosophical ideas. Suggested topics include Christianity, Islam, Judaism, Hinduism, Buddhism as well as Left and Right wing politics. Philosophical teachings must include historical figures as well as modern ideologists.

    v. Modern Foreign Language is to include teaching of base grammar, phonetics, literature and linguistics of a modern foreign language. Suggestions include French, Italian, Russian, Arabic.

    vi. History is to include teaching of major historical events, both modern and historic, in the European Union and respective nations.

    vii. Geography is to include the teaching of basic geographical notions with relevance to natural composition of the earth, as well as in relation to map-reading and orienteering techniques.

    iix. Information Technolgoy is to include the teaching of basic computer skills, such as word processing, spreadsheets and internet usage, in relation to modern-day, workplace skills.

    ix. Media studies is to include the teaching of mass media concepts as well as analytical skills in relation to modern media such as newspapers, television and films.

    Title III

    Hereby ensures that the subjects mentioned in Article II, Title I are taught until the age of 16. Hereafter, nations are encouraged to ensure students continue with education in at least four of the above subjects.

    Title IV

    Hereby ensures that all nations ensure students recieve a non-bias education, free from religious or philosophical instruction within publicly-owned schools, colleges and universities. Private educations however may include religious or philosophical instruction whilst still adhering to other mentioned curricula.

    Article III

    Title I

    Hereby ensures establishments of further education beyond the age of 18. Encourages nations to allow for these to also be free, however realises the need to ensure these are economically viable. Hence, funds shall be set up from governments to ensure those who are unable to afford further education are given government-funding scholarships. Also ensures further education establishments shall not be privately owned, nor shall profits be made that are not refunded into the establishment such as the purchasing of new neccessities including technology or buildings.

    This resolution is hereby enforced, as signed by President Stanton and Commissioner for Internal Affairs, the Rt. Hon. Jacob Stipe.



  • Original Jurisdiction

    I. The Plaintiff, the Prosecutor and the Defendant

    Article I

    In a dispute involving two parties, the party who wish to bring a legal action against another party is called the Plaintiff.
    In criminal case involving the Union versus another party, the party who wish to bring a legal action against another party is called the Prosecutor
    The party against whom the legal action is brought is called the Defendant.

    II. Commencement of Suits

    Article I

    The Plaintiff/Prosecutor in order to achieve a case against the Defendant will have to file a Complaint against the other Party at the European Court of Justice.

    Article II

    The Complaint will have the title of Plaintiff/Prosecutor v. Defendant

    Article III

    In the Complaint, the Plaintiff/Prosecutor will state the Cause of Action. The Cause of Action is a set of facts sufficient to justify a right to sue. The Cause of Action generally encompasses both the legal theory (the legal wrong the Plaintiff/Prosecutor claims to have suffered) and the remedy (the relief a court is asked to grant).

    III. Selection of Cases

    Article I

    After the Complaint is filed, within 48 hours, the Chief Justice of the European Court of Justice will summon the other Justices to a Conference to determine whether the Court will accept or reject the case. That is the Chief Justice will open a thread in the Judge's Private Chamber for the Justices to make a decision regarding the case. After 24 hours since the Complaint is filed, the Chief Justice will send personal messages to the other Justices who have not present at the Conference within the first 24 hours.

    Article II

    If the Chief Justice is not available within the first 24 hours since the Petition is filed, another Justice will take the responsibility to open such thread and send personal messages to the other Justices.

    Article III

    If a Justice cannot attend the Conference and do not provide a sufficient explanation for his/her absence, he/she may be impeached by the European Council. The petition to impeach such Justice will be initiated by the Chief Justice; or in case the said Justice is the Chief Justice, another Justice will take the responsibility to file the petition against the Chief Justice.

    Article IV

    After the Conference is organized - that is after maximum 48 hours after the Complaint is filed by the Plaintiff/Prosecutor - the Justices have 24 hours to vote whether to accept or reject the case.

    Article V

    The votes of TWO Justices at the conference will be suffice to grant certiorari - to accept - and place the case on the court's calendar.

    Article VI

    The announcement will be posted in the same thread as the Complaint.

    Article VII

    The total time for this procedure is 72 hours, or three days. This period include the time in which the Justices will discuss and vote on whether to grant certiorari to the case.

    IV. Summon of the Defendant

    Article I

    At the same time as the announcement is made, one Justice, preferably the Chief Justice, will contact the Defendant of the case and request their presence at the Court.

    Article II

    The Defendant has 48 hours to report to the Court.

    Article III

    If the Defendant fails to show up at the Court within 48 hours after the Summon is issued, they will lose the right to defend themselves at the Court and the Case will proceed without the presence of the Defendant.

    Article IV

    The total time for this procedure is 48 hours, or two days.

    V. Hearing of Cases

    Article I

    Filing Briefs: After the Defendant reports to the Court or the Summon period expires, both Parties have 48 hours outline their arguments.

    Article II

    Argument: Within 48 hours after the outlines of the arguments are submitted, both Parties will have a chance to argue for their Case.

    Article III

    The Court will decide whether to extend this period to over 48 hours.

    Article IV

    The approximated time for this procedure is 96 hours, or four days.

    VI. Justices Discussion

    Article I

    Within 48 hours after the presentation of the Plaintiff/Prosecutor and the Defendant, the Justices will meet in a private Conference to decide the Verdict.

    Article II

    The Court will decide whether to extend this period to over 48 hours.

    Article III

    If a Justice cannot attend the Conference and do not provide a sufficient explanation for his/her absence, he/she may be impeached by the European Council. The petition to impeach such Justice will be initiated by the Chief Justice; or in case the said Justice is the Chief Justice, another Justice will take the responsibility to file the petition against the Chief Justice.

    Article IV

    The approximated time for this procedure is 48 hours, or four days.

    VII. Verdicts

    Article I

    After the Justices have reached the final decision, the Chief Justice will announce the Verdict for the Case.

    Court of Appeals

    VIII. Appeals

    Article I

    Within 48 hours after the Verdict is announced, the Plaintiff/Prosecutor and the Defendant will have ONE chance to appeal against the Verdict.

    Article II

    The total time for this procedure is 48 hours, or two days.

    IX. Final Opinion

    Article I

    Within 48 hours after the Appeal is submitted, the Justices will review the case and decide whether to change the Verdict.

    Article II

    A Final Opinion will be announced.

    Article III

    The approximated time for a case without appeal is 264 hours, or 11 days, with appeal is 360 hours, or 15 days.


    Ezekiel Thomas Lloyd
    Justice of the European Court of Justice.

    Reviewed by Jacob Stipe, Jonathan Anaximander Aurelius, Jonas Pfetzing, and Ine Kelander am Daen



  • Rights of the Accused

    I. Questioning Proceedure

    Rule 1. Upon the European Court of Justice requesting a citizen or national representative to appear for questioning, said accused shall be granted access to a lawyer, state-appointed if requested by said accused.

    **Rule 2. **Upon appearing for questioning, said accused shall not be questioned for more than 3 hours stretches without a break of at least 45 minutes.

    **Rule 3. **Upon appearing for questioning, ECoJ shall ensure questioning does not take place between 21.00 - 06.00 in nation of questioning.

    **Rule 4. **Upon appearing for questioning, said accused shall not be questioned for more than 48 hours without charge.

    II. Upon being Charged

    **Rule 5. **If the ECoJ decide to charge, said accused shall be given access to all documents concerning their own case as determined by their own lawyer. ECoJ may, with an absolute majority, decide to blank-out any areas of documentation that are either of no relevance to the case in hand, of regional security or of personal information which could endanger any witness or persons otherwise related to the case. The ECoJ may not remove any information of evidence against the accused. Any requests for documentation by the accused's lawyer shall be made through the Chief Justice under whose authority it shall be to gather all documentation unavailable to the public.

    **Rule 6. **Upon being Charged, said accused may request a Deferment of Trial upon to 12 hours before the Trial is held to ensure said accused defence is ready. Deferment may be granted by the ECoJ of a period no longer than 72 hours.

    **Rule 7. **Should any relevant evidence be revealed 48 hours or fewer before the trial, the ECoJ may enforce a Deferment of Trial to discuss such information. The deferment shall be of a period of no longer than 72 hours. Any ECoJ Justice may request said deferment.

    III. Upon Trial

    Rule 8. Upon being Tried, said accused shall be granted the Right to Defense. They shall have the freedom to call upon any witness or otherwise relevant person. Their representative shall have the freedom to cross-examine any witness brought forth by the ECoJ.

    **Rule 9. **If found Not Guilty, said accused shall be granted Habeus Corpus whereupon they shall not be Tried for the same crime again.

    Written by Chief Justice Jacob Stipe
    Co-authored by the ECoJ


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